Search

You may also like

36 Views
Tiwa Savage Reveals What To Expect In Her Next Music Video
Celebrities - Entertainment - Music -

Tiwa Savage Reveals What To Expect In Her Next Music Video

Nigerian singer, songwriter and actress, Tiwa Savage has said she might  shock her audience with the unexpected in her next music video. Tiwa who was speaking to the BBC as part of promoting her next album titled ‘Celia’ made the shocking revelation when asked about […]

36 Views
"Nigeria does not have Coronavirus. It’s just a way of stealing money" Pastor David Ibiyeomi says (video)
Celebrities - Comedy - Entertainment - Local news - Movies - Music - News -

"Nigeria does not have Coronavirus. It’s just a way of stealing money" Pastor David Ibiyeomi says (video)

Pastor David Ibiyeomi, the senior pastor of Salvation Ministries, in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, has said there is no Coronavirus in Nigeria. He said malaria kills more people, yet no one closed the border because of malaria. He referenced DAAR Communications founder, Raymond Dokpesi who said he was […]

36 Views
Here's everything that's new in the Windows 10 May update
Technology -

Here's everything that's new in the Windows 10 May update

Windows Latest writes that the May update, which was supposed to roll out on May 12 but got delayed due to a zero-day vulnerability, will start rolling out between May 26 – 28. Let’s hope it doesn’t cause the kind of issues we’re used to […]

www.gistpad.com.ng

The 1918 Spanish Flu Killed Millions — and Experts Fear It Could Happen Again

Health History

The 1918 Spanish Flu Killed Millions — and Experts Fear It Could Happen Again

It was a disease like no other, in terms of worldwide scope. One hundred years ago, the Spanish influenza pandemic caused the deaths of at least 50 million people around the globe, although some experts think the death toll might have been as high as 100 million. Compare that with the last H1N1 flu pandemic of 2009, which killed an estimated 284,000 people, yet still managed to grip the world with fear. It’s easy to see why some people would be skittish about the possibility of an event as huge as the 1918 one happening again. But now that we know so much more about how diseases are spread, how is this possible?

Paris-based science journalist Laura Spinney literally wrote the book on the 1918 pandemic (it’s called “Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How It Changed the World”). “I think the thing to understand is that the experts consider 1918 to be very exceptional,” she says, adding that of the last five flu pandemics, none were so deadly as 1918’s. “It was in a league of its own.”

The 1918 flu was insidious and sneaky in nature, which helped it to sicken more than one-fifth of the world’s population at the time. It would be the equivalent today of a disease sickening 1.5 billion people worldwide.

The first phase of the pandemic occurred in the spring of 1918 and caused few deaths. It roared back with a vengeance that fall, however. A less deadly, but still devastating third wave emerged again in the spring of 1919. The reason for the end of the pandemic is still a mystery. All told, Spanish flu would cause the deaths of more people than any other plague-like illness in history.

In the U.S., it was first detected in military camps. Although the disease’s origins have been hotly debated (was it Europe, the U.S. or even China?) Spinney — and others — believe that Kansas was ground zero because the strain that caused Spanish flu in humans resembled one circulating in birds there at the time. The close quarters and massive troop movements of World War I helped to spread the disease around the world — and officials in various countries initially kept quiet about it to maintain public morale. In the end at least three times as many people died from Spanish flu as from all the conflicts associated with Word War I.

Th symptoms initially were those of classic flu — fever, sore throat, headaches — but later patients turned blue in the face, bled from noses and mouths and had trouble breathing. If their lungs got too congested with fluid, they couldn’t breathe and died within hours or days.

Back then, scientists had not yet discovered viruses, so there were no tests nor drugs to help treat the deadly disease. But the severity of the outbreak led to many ground-breaking innovations in public health that we’ve come to take for granted.

                                                            Photo: Howstuffswork/ Red Cross personnel in Washington 1918

Lessons of the Spanish Flu Epidemic

Prior to the onslaught of Spanish flu, the prevailing theory was that the poor and working classes were to blame for the diseases they caught, with little regard to the conditions they lived and worked in and how that played a role in infectious illness. However, the Spanish influenza spared no one, affecting people across class and geographic boundaries without fail. As a result, the powers-that-be realized that prevention and treatment had to happen at the population level.

“People had a rethink after the 1918 pandemic,” Spinney says. “If we want to protect ourselves from these terrible diseases, we have to start thinking preventively and collectively.”

To that end, the experience served as a stimulus to the development of socialized medicine. “The idea is that you should be able to have access to healthcare wherever you are, whatever sector of society you come from,” she says. Russia and Germany were particular pioneers of this concept, with other parts of the world, like the United States, gravitating toward employer-based insurance options.

Another major advancement inspired by the 1918 flu was the systemic gathering of healthcare data, not just during pandemics. Epidemiology – the study of why diseases and outcomes happen in a population – became a particular focus for public health experts in the 1920s. Also, an international bureau for fighting epidemics began in 1919, which eventually evolved into the World Health Organization (WHO).

Could This Happen Again?

Now for the literally trillion-dollar question: Could such an immense pandemic happen again, even with all of the major advancements of the last century? “They’re not ruling it out,” Spinney says, citing a 2015 report by The World Bank that 33 million people could die in as little as 250 days if an outbreak on the same severity scale as 1918’s occurred today. The estimated $3.7 trillion price tag of such an outbreak is daunting as well.

Indeed, public health officials are tasked with a tricky situation. “It’s really important to say how difficult it is to get the message out,” Spinney says, particularly in regard to the flu vaccine because of the variability in risk potential. “In 2009 there was a lot of alarmist talk, then ‘only’ 300,000 people died. But it could have been 50 million,” she says. (Incidentally, the reason that the 2009 H1N1 pandemic caused such a ruckus is that scientists know now that the Spanish influenza was also an H1N1 virus).

Read more…

Related topics Animals, Dogs, People
Previous post Next post

Your reaction to this post?

Leave a Reply

avatar
500
  Subscribe  
Notify of

You may also like

0 Views Views
Nigerians on Twitter tackle Presidential aide, Bashir Ahmed, over his tweet about the Second Niger Bridge
People

Nigerians on Twitter tackle Presidential aide, Bashir Ahmed, over his tweet about the Second Niger Bridge

Bashir Ahmad, President Buhari's Personal Assistant on New Media, is currently the number one trending topic on Twitter as Nigerians are reacting to a Tweet he shared about the second Niger Bridge. Bashir in the early hours of today tweeted that when completed, the Second Niger Bridge […]

0 Views Views
“Nigeria does not have Coronavirus. It’s just a way of stealing money” Pastor David Ibiyeomi says (video)
People

“Nigeria does not have Coronavirus. It’s just a way of stealing money” Pastor David Ibiyeomi says (video)

Pastor David Ibiyeomi, the senior pastor of Salvation Ministries, in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, has said there is no Coronavirus in Nigeria. He said malaria kills more people, yet no one closed the border because of malaria. He referenced DAAR Communications founder, Raymond Dokpesi who said […]

0 Views Views
Tiwa Savage Reveals What To Expect In Her Next Music Video
People

Tiwa Savage Reveals What To Expect In Her Next Music Video

Nigerian singer, songwriter and actress, Tiwa Savage has said she might  shock her audience with the unexpected in her next music video. Tiwa who was speaking to the BBC as part of promoting her next album titled ‘Celia’ made the shocking revelation when asked about […]