Search

You may also like

36 Views
Niniola dazzles in cleavage-baring outfit (Photo)
Celebrities - Comedy - Entertainment - Local news - Movies - Music - News -

Niniola dazzles in cleavage-baring outfit (Photo)

Nigerian singer, Niniola took to her Instagram page to share this dazzling photo of herself posing in a cleavage-baring outfit.The post Niniola dazzles in cleavage-baring outfit (Photo) appeared first on Linda Ikeji Blog. Source link Related posts: IK Ogbonna threatens lawsuit against Nigerian lady who […]

36 Views
RMD all smiles with her daughter in rare photo
Celebrities - Entertainment - Music -

RMD all smiles with her daughter in rare photo

Nollywood actor, Richard Mofe Damijo, RMD shared these photos of himself and his daughter on Instagram, and he pointed our attention to their resemblance. He revealed that his wife says all the time that he is the lucky, to have all his kids resemble him. […]

36 Views
President Buhari is the most democratic ex-military head of state – Kogi state governor, Yahaya Bello
Celebrities - Comedy - Entertainment - Local news - Movies - Music - News -

President Buhari is the most democratic ex-military head of state – Kogi state governor, Yahaya Bello

Governor Yahaya Bello of Kogi state, has said that President Buhari is the most democratic ex-military president he has seen in his entire life. Governor Bello said this while reacting to the decision by Punch's editorial to henceforth refer to President Buhari as General Buhari. Speaking to state […]

www.gistpad.com.ng

Why We’re Drawn to Leaders Who Emphasize the Negative

Leadership

Why We’re Drawn to Leaders Who Emphasize the Negative

There’s a tendency to assume that we want our leaders to be encouraging, magnanimous, and optimistic. But in the last decade, across borders and sectors, we’ve been seeing an increasing number of leaders better known for a style that is more vitriolic, punitive, and negative. This disconnect led me to wonder how positive or negative rhetoric affects our perception of someone’s leadership. My subsequent research shows that although we may think we want our leaders to be cheerleaders, we instinctively tend to empower naysayers instead.

As prior research has shown, we humans create social hierarchies to preserve order and form rich expectations of how the powerful will behave. We have evolved to be sensitive to the behavioral cues that signal these power dynamics. For instance, we often associate a person’s physical height with power, which leads us to attribute more power and status to tall people. These kinds of associations may be particularly influential when we’re just getting to know the person and initially sussing out our relative places on the social hierarchy.

My own research focuses on whether people interpret naysaying — the act of negating, refuting, or criticizing (without explicit intention to hurt a particular target) — as a similar kind of power-signaling cue.

The eleven controlled experiments I conducted to explore this question suggest that a causal link between naysaying and perceptions of power does exist. In one study I asked 518 eligible U.S. voters to read four pairs of statements made by U.S. presidential candidates during nationally televised debates between 1980 and 2008. They were not told the candidates’ names or when each debate took place. Each pair included one statement that was positive and supportive in regard to America’s future (for example, George H.W. Bush in 1988: “…And I ask for your supportWorking together, we can do wonderful things for the United States and the Free World”), and a second that was critical and negative (for example, John B. Anderson in 1980: “…It’s been a time, therefore, of illusion and false hopes, and the longer it continues, the more dangerous it becomes.”). Based on just these quotes, they then rated how powerful each candidate seemed, their relative effectiveness as president, and for whom they would have voted between each pair.

Not only did the study participants deem the naysaying presidential candidates to be more powerful, they also predicted those candidates to be more effective while in office. They also revealed that they were more willing to vote for the naysaying candidate over the cheerleading one.

This effect is not isolated to the political arena. In subsequent studies, across seven other contexts such as art reviews and opinions on social issues, participants consistently associated naysaying with power. And though they perceived naysayers as less likeable and no more competent than cheerleaders or leaders who made more neutral statements, the participants nevertheless endorsed them as leaders of all the entities I asked them about — from an online discussion group to the United States. This was true even if the participants were told that they themselves would be subjected to the naysayer’s leadership.

So why do people empower and endorse naysayers? I suspect that the cause is rooted in human psychology. In actively criticizing, negating, or refuting another person or entity, naysayers could be perceived as acting independently, according to their own agency — a key determinant of power. This, in turn, fuels the perception of naysayers’ power as being untethered from any social constraints or other people’s resources, making them seem all the more powerful. Indeed, data from four of our studies support the role of agency as one underlying cause of this effect.

I also wondered whether acting as a naysayer makes someone feel more powerful. To find out, I conducted a series of experiments in which people took on the roles of a naysayer, cheerleader, or neutral party across a number of domains. The results revealed that indeed, naysayers felt more powerful than the other two groups — even though the act of naysaying did not fuel their sense of competence in the subject they were critiquing.

This connection between naysaying and power might make it appealing for ambitious leaders to embrace more critical rhetoric. But there are reasons for caution. First, our perception of a leader’s power evolves over…

Continue Reading

Related topics Animals, Dogs, People
Previous post Next post

Your reaction to this post?

Leave a Reply

avatar
500
  Subscribe  
Notify of

You may also like

0 Views Views
Nigerian man mocks Wizkid for using an iPhone 8 (Video)
People

Nigerian man mocks Wizkid for using an iPhone 8 (Video)

Wizkid Nigerian music star, Wizkid, was mocked Thursday after his attempt to advertise Ciroc vodka ended up exposing his Iphone 8 mobile phone. Wizkid, one of the biggest afrobeat giants in Nigeria posted a video on his Instagram live on Thursday, flaunting a Ciroc Vodka […]

0 Views Views
Nigerian man shares his encounter with a ghost at a bank
People

Nigerian man shares his encounter with a ghost at a bank

A Nigerian man identified as Ejike Ofoegbu has taken to social media to narrate his encounter with a ghost at a bank. Read his post below; I never believed dead men work again until what I saw today made me to believe so, I have […]

0 Views Views
Niniola dazzles in cleavage-baring outfit (Photo)
People

Niniola dazzles in cleavage-baring outfit (Photo)

Nigerian singer, Niniola took to her Instagram page to share this dazzling photo of herself posing in a cleavage-baring outfit.The post Niniola dazzles in cleavage-baring outfit (Photo) appeared first on Linda Ikeji Blog. Source link Related posts: IK Ogbonna threatens lawsuit against Nigerian lady who […]